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Snooze your pill alarm

Sep 7, 2018

Quick tip today:

I know that I've written about using alarms to remember to take pills. The follow up to that is to use the snooze button. Set up an alarm that you can set to go off every day at the same time with a custom tone that will get your attention but not annoy you. And make sure the app has a snooze button. I can tell you from personal experience, if I'm in my office and I turn off my alarm and head to the front hall where my pills are in my bag... random thought, squirrel, butterfly, what am I cooking for dinner, am I picking up my daughter today, what's next on my To Do List?... a thousand things can distract me before those pills are in my mouth. So, I either let the alarms continue to go off or snooze it for 7 minutes until they are literally in my mouth. Try it!

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Detailed work out logging?

Sep 2, 2018

So, I've always seen folks at the gym with their notebooks and pens taking what look like painstakingly detailed notes about their reps and the weight, and God knows what else. I had an complimentary intro session with a trainer at a gym a long, long time ago and he gave me some sort of chart to keep when working out. I hated it. 

Recently, a client of mine (who's a former trainer) expressed to me that she's really challenged by working out theses days because she doesn't feel like she has enough of a plan and because it seems overwhelming to create one and stick with it. Thus, she's been avoiding working out. Total ADHD (& anxiety) response. 

I'm sure I do not represent the thoughts and feelings of every ADHDer who works out. I am not a fan of the detailed workout log and hers's why:
  1. I consider my workout part of my mindfulness practice. Particularly when lifting, I like to go into "the zone" and do my routine. I find that enjoyable, believe it or not. Since I have ADHD, transitioning my attention is not my strongest point. Nor is tediously logging details. So, to have to transition after every set or every exercise would break my flow and be considerably less enjoyable. 
  2. Plateauing is a real thing. And, we like instant gratification. So seeing that  you haven't progressed (or, God forbid, have a bad day and regressed a bit,) can be demoralizing. When in actuality, maybe it was mostly a great work out. Sometimes doing what you did last time is a great work out. 
  3. It seems unnecessary to me. Lift what you can lift. Do the sets that you can do. And, get what you want to get out of it.
I do track my workouts but only in the sense that I did it. For example, yesterday I noted on my calendar: 72m St/CR/PT/3xA+/250xC+ Meaning that I did 72 minutes, stretched, did my core, did my PT for my shoulder, did 3 sets of bi's and tri's, and 250 total reps for my chest. The +'s just mean that I feel like those were particularly strong workouts... All without being on the super micro level. Happy lifting!




Standard Disclaimer:  In an effort to foil my own perfectionist tendencies, I do not edit my posts much… if at all. Please and typos, mistakes, grammatical errors, or awkward phrasing. I focus on getting my content down. An imperfect post completed is better than a perfect post that goes unposted.

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Keeping your child's weight up on stumlants

Aug 23, 2018

One of the major side effects of stimulant therapy is loss of appetite. As an almost 40-year-old, I wish my meds still took away my appetite the way they did when I was a kid. No such luck. But now I’m dealing with the same issue with my nine-year-old. Well, not the exact same issue. He actually eats a lot more than I did at his age. I had to supplement with old-school Ensure protein shakes. The graphic on the bottle makes it look fantastic. I can assure you that in the late eighties it was not. Super disgusting! My guy eats a good breakfast, claims to eat a decent lunch, and eats an enormous dinner. But he’s holding steady in the third percentile of height and weight. So it’s more of a concern with his overall growth. As background, both my wife, my brother-in-law, and myself all grew super late. In my case, I appear to have gotten the short genes in the family.


My point is that the pediatrician had us go see the nutritionist about my son’s eating. She was great and gave up lots of options based on our food values. In other words, as a former chef I know a lot about food and we are pretty serious about eating low sugar, healthy, non-processed diets. So the nutritionist gave us lots of options to give him high impact, high energy foods that are also healthy. We’ve added in a cup of 2% milk with dinner and are experimenting with different nut butters and dried fruits so he doesn’t get sick of PB and craisins (which are usually pretty high in refined sugar anyway.)


My biggest area of emphasis is his breakfast. He is very much all about white flour and sugar for breakfast. I can sneak in some sausage. But eggs are a challenge, and he won’t eat more healthy and interesting cereals.  And breakfast is the meal that we need to make and eat quick. I’m not so happy with frozen waffles and syrup as a regular part of the rotation unless it is accompanied by a banana and sausage.


He’s only ever had scrambled eggs and often complains about them… even with ketchup when I give them to him, even though it’s only about once every three weeks. So, I wanted to expose him to other styles of eggs. Because eggs are a great breakfast that is actually really quick to make. So, I gave him an egg sampler today. If you’re not a former professional chef, you may not want to try this on a Tuesday. But we found out that he likes a fried egg/ over hard. And, we came to the conclusion that he thinks he could eat eggs once a week alternating scrambled and over hard. Victory!




Standard Disclaimer:  In an effort to foil my own perfectionist tendencies, I do not edit my posts much… if at all. Please and typos, mistakes, grammatical errors, or awkward phrasing. I focus on getting my content down. An imperfect post completed is better than a perfect post that goes unposted.


Keeping your child's weight up on stumlants

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Non-ADHD life hack... or is it?

Aug 14, 2018

This has no bearing on ADHD but... I finally figured out a solution to a problem that has annoyed me for years and I feel the need to share. Whenever I take my propane tank to exchange at Curry Hardware it becomes a unpleasantly rolly-polly missile in my my car. I've tried packing stuff around it, putting it on the floor in the front seat, floor in the back seat, sitting it up, putting it on it's side and wedging stuff under it. It always got loose. But I finally figured it out. See the picture.

The ADHD life hack part is that I own two tanks. So I never run out in the middle of a BBQ. When on tank runs dry, I switch it out and IMMEDIATELY put refilling the first tank on my list of things to do. Then I don't forget and have at least a few weeks to get it exchanged. 
Non-ADHD life hack... or is it?

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Sticking with it!

Aug 10, 2018

So, I've always wanted to play an instrument. I tried the guitar around culinary school and the beginning of my career as a chef. It wasn't the right time for me and it wasn't the right instrument. But that was 15 years ago. For a while now I've been thinking that the drums are the right answer for me. But, I don't want to be the guy who gets them, takes a few lessons and doesn't practice. So, I've waited a long time to make sure that I'm ready to commit. I started three weeks ago and and practicing a few times a week and getting better... and having fun. One of the ways that I'm doing that is by keeping a super basic practice chart/calendar. It give me positive momentum. I've talked about using this sort of thing for working out in the past. But it works really well for anything that you want to be consistent about. Check out the pic. Doesn't have to be fancy.
Sticking with it!

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2 Great "Fitness" Apps & Why They Are Great For ADHDers

Aug 3, 2018

I think I need to establish some givens in order to make this post as relevant to ADHD as I know it to be. 

1st given: Exercise positively effect ATTENTION as well as mood and lessens anxiety. It helps manage hyperactivity and internal restlessness. 

2nd given: Most ADHDers have a hard time setting up any routine, especially one that, by definition, requires consistency and intensity. 

3rd given: I get demonstrable benefits from working out everyday. And, I'd say about 80% of my clients struggle to get the exercise I would argue that they need. 

4th (not quite) given: There is plenty of emerging research that there is such a thing as an ADHD friendly diet. Lots of veggies, higher in lean protein, lower carbs, very low sugar, plenty of good fats, etc. Pretty much what's good for humans, but it's extra good for us. 

So, that's why I'm reviewing fitness apps. I've always said that keeping track of success is a great way to establish routine and make lasting life change. I alway suggest my clients use a blank calendar to keep track of days exercised. I do is as a seperate calendar in my digital calendar world. But I mark all my work outs and it feels sooooo good at the end of the month to see all those gold bars representing my work out "events." But I also like to keep track of what I do. Specifically when running, I want to know how far and how fast. Which leads me to:

App no. 1: Map My Run (Might be Map My Fitness now...)  Apps Website  I'm sure many of you have already heard of it. I'm also sure that there are many equally good competing apps. This is just the one I use. It is overall great. You can also log all your other workouts if this is the place you want to keep track of what you do.

App. no. 2: My Fitness Pal.  App's Website  My wife got hipped to this app when doing a month long health/weight challenge about a year and a half ago. It is great. You put in your weight and your goals and it calculates what you need to do in terms of calories to make that goal. I get the impression that the paid version is even cooler with many more features. But even the basic is great. You can create your own recipes and everything saves for you so you don't have to reenter ever time. It scans bar codes and has a tremendous number of items in its database. Relatively intuitive and seems to be very accurate. 

And, it's great for us as ADHDers because it challenges us to be present in the moment and make good choices, it teaches us the reality of what we are eating, and it give us a record so we can't forget. I have a nutrition background as a former chef. But, I can easily get complacent and say that a certain food isn't that bad. But when it's there in black and white that that piece of pizza is 300 calories, that will make me think twice about have 3 more.

And they are both Under Armour owned so you can link them and make them work together. Hooray technology!  

Last suggestion with the eating app. Challenge yourself to do if for a week. See how it goes. If you're moderately successful. Challenge yourself to finish out the month. See how you feel. How's your ADHD? How's your anxiety? 


Standard Disclaimer:  In an effort to foil my own perfectionist tendencies, I do not edit my posts much… if at all. Please and typos, mistakes, grammatical errors, or awkward phrasing. I focus on getting my content down. An imperfect post completed is better than a perfect post that goes unposted.






2 Great "Fitness" Apps & Why They Are Great For ADHDers
2 Great "Fitness" Apps & Why They Are Great For ADHDers

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